Friday, February 23, 2007

Beta Defining SOA, or adding to the pollution.

Defining SOA, or adding to the pollution.

Someone sent me this link to a movie on SOA. Those gold disks look pretty expensive. And I hope the red bouncing balls don't have to change colour, or shape; it could break the expensive gold disks.

My immediate response to anything about SOA is SnakeOil. This is because I have never found a good definition of SOA that I really liked; something really visceral that you can chew on. Mostly I have found the definitions to have too much hand waving, with high minded terms that I don't really understand. Or else, too obvious to be of any use.

REST is more tangible, for example, anything that can have an identity can be a resource. OK then, I have this thing, not really sure what this thing is, but at least I can give it a URI. However, REST does have a few glib phrases: "hypermedia as the engine of application state", but they add spice.

I have been challenged to provide my own definition of SOA. Normally, I am loathe to create definitions as it pollutes the world and causes confusion. It is always better to reference an existing definition. Even this concept is RESTful, if you reference an existing definition you get the same network effects as linking; the more people that "link" to that definition the more authoritative it becomes. This doesn't always work though, the definitive definition of REST, Dr. Fielding's thesis, is not the top hit in Google for the term REST. However, in any debate Dr. Fielding always has the last word on what REST means, though he may of course be wrong in what he asserts in his thesis; REST is his word, and his definition is the only correct one. Of course his definition may change over time, but this is just as unhealthy as creating new definitions in terms of confusing people.

So what is my definition of SOA. An architecture for a distributed system based on services, is nice and vapid, though logically sound. The key, then is to define a service.

A service interface is defined by the set of messages it can process, and the set of messages it emits. The set of messages it can process, MessagesIn, and the set of messages it emits, MessagesOut, can change over time. There may exist a mapping of a subset of MessagesIn to a subset of MessagesOut, such that if the service receives a message from this subset of MessagesIn it will emit a message from the subset of MessagesOut. A service interface description describes a subset of the MessagesIn that a service can process, a subset of MessagesOut that a service can emit and any mapping between the subsets of MessagesIn and MessagesOut that it describes. A service interface description only defines sets of messages at a particular time, so a service may have a series of service interface descriptions. A service interface description is incomplete if it does not include the compete set of MessagesIn and MessagesOut for a service at a particular time. Since it is only possible to communicate using messages, and as messages must take a finite time to travel between sender and receiver, a client can never know if a service interface description is still valid (assuming the service interface description is in the MessagesOut set). A service interface description is faulty if it describes a set of input or output messages that includes messages which are not in MessagesIn or MessagesOut.

A service may also have internal state, and can be modelled by a state machine. This state machine may or may not be deterministic. The mapping of input to output messages may depend on the internal state of the machine, and the mapping may change over time.

Service developers should make the set of messages MessagesIn as large as possible, preferably it should be an infinite set to make interoperability and service description easier. Service developers should constrain the size of MessagesOut to be as small as possible, preferably a set with no members, as it makes interoperability and service description easier. (The last two clauses are a form of Postal's Law). Service developers should make the internal state of their service as large as possible, preferably of infinite size because then they will be better than Google, and can charge a lot for advertising. If a service developer achieves this, an infinite set of MessagesIn, a zero size set of MessagesOut with an infinite amount of internal state, then they will have created God.

2 Comments:

Blogger Slam Master A said...

f a service developer achieves this, an infinite set of MessagesIn, a zero size set of MessagesOut with an infinite amount of internal state, then they will have created God.

So, basically, what you are saying is that God listens, never talks back, and knows everything? That's very Modern Catholic of you. =)

Personally, I fell I have a pretty good grasp SOA, but to define it and explain it in a way that takes less than a few days to convey is not something that I want to try. Yet.

6:08 PM  
Blogger Arnon said...

I published an attempt at defining SOA which I think isn't that far from yours.
In essence it talks about defining SOA as an architectural style for building systems based on interacting coarse grained autonomous components called services. Each service expose processes and behavior through contracts, which are composed of messages at discoverable addresses called endpoints. Services’ behavior is governed by policies which are set externally to the service itself

1:08 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home